Clockwise or counter-clockwise?

I don’t follow figure skating closely, but I know a lot of students are huge fans of Yuzuru Hanyu.

“Hanyu still looks good for gold at worlds despite defeat” (from the Japan Times)

But have you ever thought about which direction skaters, ballet dancers, gymnasts and other athletes spin? Is it usually clockwise or counter-clockwise? (I hope past students remember those words, as we used them many times in class! And you may come across the word “anti-clockwise” too.)

See more GIFS here (from the Atlantic)

This article researched the question: “Why do ballet dancers turn clockwise?” (from Ballet Focus)

You can also see which way Michael Jackson spins when he does his moon-walk.  (Spoiler alert) there’s not a very surprising (or satisfying) answer, but it’s fun to watch the videos and it’s a great idea for a research project. Also, this is one article where the comments section doesn’t include a bunch of trolls.

And for people like me who look at the various ice skating jumps and think they mostly look the same (axel? salchow? toe loop? lutz? What’s the difference?), here’s an explainer. Next time you watch Hanyu and Mai Mihara, you can understand what they’re doing better.

Put some color in your life

This is a reminder about what school (and work) often becomes … and what it can be if we encourage more creativity.

It also reminds me a lot of the movie “Pleasantville”. The metaphor is different, but there are similarities in the use of color.  If you haven’t seen this movie, you really should. The Japanese title is 「カラー・オブ・ハート」and it stars Tobey Maguire, a few years before he was Spiderman. Here’s the trailer. Fans of the “Fast and Furious” series (Japanese title: 「ワイルド・スピード」may recognize Paul Walker, too.

“It all starts with a story.”

Pixar in a Box is free lesson series of videos and activities from Khan Academy about storytelling and making animated videos. Here’s the Introduction to Storytelling video:

If this interests you, go back and start with the introduction video to this lesson series on the Khan Academy site. These videos have transcripts, to help your listening comprehension.

This is a free course, and you don’t have to sign up to just enjoy it, but if you want to save your progress, sign up.

If you’re unfamiliar with Khan Academy, here’s Salman Khan’s TED Talk from several years ago, when the organization was just starting out:

Going viral

This subway performer’s videos have gone viral at least a few times in recent years. You wonder (well, I wonder) why some arguably less talented singers go viral. Piko Taro said last year that he had not made much money off his “song” and Mike Yung, if you look at his Twitter feed, hasn’t either.

This was funny (he means “front page”):

A student last semester did a research project about what it takes for people to become famous. He never really found a secret formula (and if he had, we’d all know him by now, right?). But what do you think? Why do some people, or videos, go viral and others don’t? (writing prompt). And another writing prompt can be: Explain what Reddit is to Mr. Yung.

Anyway, I could listen to “A Change is Gonna Come” over and over again. Not something I can say about PPAP.

Read more about Mike Yung here: “Searching the Subway for Mike Yung, the Viral Singer that Time Forgot” (from Pitchfork)