99%

According to this short article from PRI, 99% of the refugees seeking asylum in Japan are rejected. Here’s the story of one who wasn’t. (You can listen to the audio, though it’s not the same as the written text. I suggest reading first and then listening, after you have a good idea about the story).

It’s a good story to learn about the people behind the statistics.

“Meet one of the handful of Syrians granted asylum in Japan”

 

 

A survey to document discrimination

In some classes this term, students have been making surveys to collect information about people’s knowledge, experiences, and opinions on a variety of themes. I happened across this article this morning that has an interesting survey. They want to know: “Have you experienced or witnessed hate?” Their goal is to collect people’s stories to better understand hate crimes and discrimination.

This survey appears to be only collecting information about discrimination and hate from the U.S., but it’s a good discussion starter and may help you with your own surveys.

A mile in their shoes

The idiom “to walk a mile in someone’s shoes” means …

Can you guess?

Here’s a short article that will help: about an artist who has depicted various world leaders as refugees: “This Syrian Artist Wants World Leaders to┬áTo Know What It Feels Like To Be Refugees” (from BuzzFeed). Here are three. There are several more in the article, and more pictures and a couple of videos on the artist’s website.

“Vlad”

“Donald”

“The Queue”

If you’d like a detailed definition of the idiom, here’s one with examples, from Grammarist.

The right to recline

In recent years, there have been countless incidents on airplanes in which passengers get into fights about space: Who gets the armrest? Is it ok to recline? This article talks about ways to prevent such arguments:

“How to Resolve Fights over Reclining Airplane Seats: Use Behavioral Economics” (Evonomics, May 12)

Reading this reminded me of a bus ride I was on in Cambodia. Across the aisle, I saw a man reclined in his seat, sleeping peacefully, while the mother and child behind him looked less than comfortable.

What do you think? Should the man have checked first before he reclined fully? Or is it the responsiblity of the bus manufacturer to design better buses, trains and plances, to make sure kids-on-laps aren’t squished?