A day in the life

The California Sunday Magazine has a whole issue about teenagers this month. Because:

“We wanted to see how they’re living right now in the world adults made for them and how they’re beginning to change it — and maybe get a glimpse of where we’re all headed together.”

Here’s the cover photo:

Stories include:

Life advice from teen experts — how to meet new people, how to get people to care about something, how to say no, how to throw a good dance party (and more)

The two hour commute — see how three teenagers commute, with illustrations

How they do lunch

A conversation about social media and politics

Hanging out

This is a great model for a cross-cultural comparison or a research project about teenagers or university students in Japan: Find people to survey, ask good questions, analyze their answers, add photos and illustrations.

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In the Wrong Hands

Wrong Hands is a collection of cartoons about language, culture, society, social media, history, politics … and more. Some things you can do with these cartoons: try to explain the message or what the artist wants to say, explain why they’re funny (or a bit cynical), translate them into Japanese or your major language, and/or talk about similarities and differences in humor — why a cartoon might (not) translate well into another language.

Word on the Street, June 30, 2017

 

Large Coffee, June 16, 2017

 

Us and Them, February 10, 2017

Dietetic Idiomatic Schematic, August 26, 2016

Smart phone vs. Dog, February 26, 2016

Here’s an interview with the artist, about the name of the site and more.

“The Power of Language”

This video has five parts.

First: people who create languages for movies and TV.My favorite part of this interview is that the first step in creating a language is not the alphabet or vocabulary, or the grammar, or the sound system; it’s the people. Because if you have a language but no community in which it is used, then what’s the point, right?

I also like how the 5th step they describe is history. It’s a reminder that languages change over time, and we must change with it.


The second part is about Pokemon and 和製英語 (which many people call “Japanglish”).


Part 3 is about a young woman in Peru who is trying to preserve a dying Incan language through pop music.


Part 4 is about a man who speaks 32 languages. He’s a “hyperpolyglot” and his answer to the question, “Can you learn a language just by sitting around studying?” was:

 

Right?

The more languages you can speak and understand, the wider your perspective will become.

It may feel a little unnatural to speak in English or another language you’re learning with your Japanese classmates, but it’s a good chance to practice; for some, it’s practically your only chance.

He also is asked “What’s the most complicated langauge to learn?” What do you think his answer was? Watch to find out.


The last part is about a Deaf poet who performs slam poetry. This section talks about how the rhyming in these performances is more about poetry in movement than in sound.  (Why I capitalized the word “deaf” here.)