1000 Awesome Things

1000 Awesome Things is a list by Neil Pasricha dedicated to “the simple universal pleasures that we all love but we just don’t talk about enough.” (Quoted from his TED Talk — here’s the transcript) Practice your reading and listening comprehension and getting inspired to make your own list.

Watch his TED Talk:

A sample from the 1000 Awesome Things:

#967 Illegal naps

#122 Using nature as a fridge

#194 When insects are struggling to do something and you help them

#912 Hanging your hand out the window of a car

Bibliotherapy

books-that-heal-kids

I ran across a blog called Books That Heal Kids, was intrigued by the title and think that even though most of my students are not “kids” anymore, you can still learn a lot from — and be healed by — books meant for kids. And if those books are written in English, that’s ‘two birds with one stone’.

The blog is a collection of book reviews and recommendations by an elementary school counselor, who focuses on “bibliotherapy” — using the power of books to heal.

A video introducing a book in the “Making Mistakes” section:

Found this on Reddit. It’s called “The Joy of Reading”:

Letters of Note

Letters of Note is a compilation of more than 900 letters, postcards, memos and even faxes, often written by famous people, and almost always thought-provoking.

Here’s a recent one, from movie director Martin Scorsese, about the necessity of diversity.

diversity

An excerpt:

Why don’t they make movies like ours?
Why don’t they tell stories as we do?
Why don’t they dress as we do?
Why don’t they eat as we do?
Why don’t they talk as we do?
Why don’t they think as we do?
Why don’t they worship as we do?
Why don’t they look like us?

Ultimately, who will decide who “we” are?


Here’s one from the archives, a 1973 letter from writer E.B. White (author of Charlotte’s Web), about remaining hopeful in what seems like a hopeless situation.

wind-the-clock

An excerpt:

“Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. And wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day.”


And here’s a letter from a 10-year-old to former president Obama: “Our differences unite us.” You can see his response, too.