Chocolate ears

I found this video on a post from Youngzine about chocolate and Valentine’s Day. Youngzine is a good source of reading and watching/listening material — mostly about news & current events —  for EFL students of any age, though the specified target audience is native English speaking children.

The video has a couple of funny subtitle mistakes. Listen and see if you can correct them.

at about 1:46:

at about 2:30:



A healthy vending machine

I bought a book of short stories at a used book store years ago that was organized by length of the story. But it wasn’t by word count; it was by how long it would take you to read the story. So the first section was titled “Waiting in line at the supermarket” and others were “Waiting at a doctor’s office” and “Commuting on the train” and others I don’t remember.

This website is like that: Short Edition

It’s a France-based company, and the website is in English and French.

You can choose 1-minute, 3-minute, or 5-minute stories. For many non-native speakers, though, you might think of them as 5-minute, 10-minute, or 15-minute stories?

There’s also a section of Classics by century where you can find short stories and poems by such authors as Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland), Shakespeare, O. Henry, and many more.

And according to Mental Floss, they have installed vending machines that dispense short stories. The first one was put in France’s main airport and there are more than a hundred around that country and about 20 in the U.S.

First books

Do you remember the first book that had an impact on you? A few that I remember very, very vividly from my childhood, as much for the pictures as the stories. Not suggesting you should buy these, but take a look at the “Look inside”:

Anyway, I thought about this after seeing this video about a non-profit called First Book in a rural part of Iowa, where a “lunch lady” is organizing a book bus to help get books to children during vacations:

Our short winter vacation is coming up soon. What do you plan to read?

To do

Two things I found that I hope will inspire students as we move into longer research projects in many classes. You can be more than you think you can; you can do more than you think you can. Be curious.

From Open Culture: Leonardo da Vinci’s “To Do” list is amazing. At first it might make you feel lazy, even if you’re as busy as I think you all are. But I hope it also inspires. His intellectual curiosity is boundless. And he knows what he knows and what he doesn’t know, and he’s not afraid to ask experts. I want you to do the same.

From Mental Floss: 8 musicians who are brilliant in other fields, too. Talk about “renaissance men”! (I do wish they’d highlight some women in this list, too. Maybe that can be a research project idea for someone? Find some female musicians or athletes and also scientists, for example).

Anyway, these men continue to write and play music, while at the same time studying other things.

This is Brian May, the guitarist from Queen. 10 years ago he got his PhD, and he’s since written two books about space and helped NASA when they sent a probe to Pluto.

This is the lead singer/songwriter of The Offspring (remember them? Saw them in concert in Tokyo ages ago). He just got a PhD in molecular biology and he’s doing research into HIV and AIDS.