Games and sports

What’s a game? What’s a sport?

How would you explain the differences?

“What makes a sport a sport?”

This short piece from 1843 gives us a little background about the word “sport” as opposed to “game”. It explains that bridge (a card game) has been declared a sport, not just a game, by the European Council of Justice.

It made me think of a scene in a movie called “What Women Want” (Japanese title: ハート・オブ・ウーマン). The main characters work for an advertising agency and they’re making a commercial for Nike. Here’s the clip:

Here’s another clip that shows a bit more background. The premise of this rather silly movie is that the man (played by Mel Gibson) can read women’s minds. IMDb calls it a “romantic fantasy comedy” and it plays with the idea of stereotypical “macho” men and the women who have to deal with blatant gender inequality at work.

Love what you do

About very talented and very determined young boxer and her father:

My favorite lines:

Jesselyn Silva:

“I want to help him, and I want to help myself get better.”

and

“I never ever ever ever ever — maybe like a hundred evers — think that anything is too difficult for me.”

Her father:

“Regardless of how it turns out in the future, you’ve got to do something that you love to do. And you master it.

 

But I also really get his occasional apprehensive looks when she’s talking.

Silva mentions Claressa Shields towards the end of the video, when she’s talking about her long-term goals. Here’s an article from NPR about Shields, with audio and a transcript: “After Second Gold, Boxer Claressa Shields Looks Ahead To What’s Next” (from August 2016)

Why knot?

Here’s a short explanation from NPR about why shoelaces come untied and what you can do to prevent it. You can read the article, and listen to the story with or without the transcript. To listen click on the “play” button you’ll see in the top-left corner of the article.

The last paragraph in the transcript has one vocabulary we used in Week 1’s class. And the bad joke which I used for the title of this post.

The article mentions this TED Talk about tying your shoes. This talk has been popular with past students, probably because it’s short and easy to understand. It’s also one of the very first TED Talks. Here’s the link to the TED site, where you can watch with a transcript.

Language usage question:

What does the word “nailed” mean in this context? (This is the second paragraph of the transcript.)