Interactive worksheets and brown tea

Find interactive worksheets, and make your own if you sign up, with this site called Live Worksheets. Most of the ones in English I found were rather elementary for the students in my classes, except maybe some of the ones for articles and collocations might be helpful.

But the site also has worksheets for other languages, and these might be fun for students who are just starting to learn a third language.

I tried this simple one for colors in Chinese. It was pretty easy, because most of the kanji are the same or similar in Japanese, but I got two wrong. I guessed that 粉 would be brown, but I was wrong. I’ve never seen the Chinese kanji for brown before.

This does make me wonder why, in Japan where green tea is historically more prevalent than black tea (which is actually brown), the word in Japanese for brown is 茶色 (“tea color”).

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Tube Quizard

Tube Quizard is a collection of YouTube videos with gap-fill quizzes. You can browse in several ways: by level, by language focus, by category, and you can choose either US English or UK English. There are two other options that don’t seem to be available yet (Australian and Indian). Let’s hope this site is just getting started and more options and more videos appear soon.

Click on the empty box and the video will cue to that time. Fill in the blank and check your answer.

You can also search the archives for available quizzes. Just past a YouTube URL into this search box.  The YouTube video you use must already have subtitles.

You can also create your own gap-fill quizzes. There’s an explanatory video on the About page.

Becoming a citizen

Becoming a citizen of the U.S. may be something not many people really want to do these days, but this practice civics test for people to become naturalized citizens is a good review for people who are already citizens. I wonder if our current president could pass this test (especially question 9). Here are a few examples:

civics-test-q4

civics-test-q7

civics-test-q8

“Naturalization is the process to voluntarily become a U.S. citizen if you were born outside of the United States. You may be eligible if you can show continuous U.S. residence for three to five years, are at least 18 years old, and demonstrate good moral character and loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. You must also take the English and civics test, unless you qualify for an exemption.” (from the Explore My Options page)

The application process for permanent residents to become citizens is $640. That’s a lot of money.

I was a little nervous taking this practice test. Like a TOEIC or TOEFL test, I should pass with flying colors, right?

i-passed

This story from a couple of years ago said that high school students in one US state had to pass a civics test to graduate. I don’t think this is too much to ask. And I think that people running for president, congress, and any other public office should have to take one.

These are the requirements for becoming a Japanese citizen. Again with the “good moral character”! Where’s the practice test for that? These requirements are pretty much the same as those for becoming a US citizen. Except you’re not allowed to hold dual citizenship in Japan.

becoming-a-japanese-citizen


Writing prompt: What does being a citizen of Japan mean to you? Would you ever give up your Japanese citizenship to become a citizen of another country? Why do you think some immigrants to Japan become naturalized citizens? Do you know any?