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A travel writer from the National Geographic set herself a goal on her vacation to Belize: try not to use any single-use plastic. She ended up avoiding it 79 times.

“You don’t have to be perfect. Even if you mess up along the way, doing *something* makes a difference.”

And this goes for your English, too. It doesn’t have to be perfect; just do something.

Let’s all try to follow her example this summer. I’ll be back in September with more topics. In the meantime, there’s plenty in the archives to read, watch, and learn about, and then to talk about with your friends or write about in your porfolio.

 

 

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What would you take to space?

This article from Atlas Obscura explains about some of the food choices astronauts can make.

“Eating Like an Astronaut Means Kimchi for Koreans and Lasagna for Italians”

Of course, this is not to say that Koreans can’t have lasagna and Italians can’t have kimchi.

So what woud you take to space? Typical traditional Japanese foods like miso soup, rice, pickle and grilled fish? More modern Japanese foods like omu-rice, okonomiyaki or ramen? If you think that would be too hard to eat in zero-gravity, scan the article for “Space Ram”.

Skim the article for other interesting details like whether or not food in zero gravity is blander or spicier than it is on Earth, why crumbly foods like croissants can be dangerous, and how they dealth with kimchi’s strong smell.

My choice would probably be a different culture’s food each day of the week. Indian curry on Monday, Thai gapao on Tuesday, onigiri and miso soup on Wednesday, Korean bibimbap on Thursday, fish on Friday…