Draw a circle

Right now, before you continue reading, draw a circle on a piece of paper.

 

 

Now, try it again on your phone or computer (click on the screenshot below, but try not to read the headline or article yet; just scroll down a little until you see this):

So, did you draw it clockwise or counter-clockwise? Did you start at the top or the bottom?

Read on: “Different languages: How cultures around the world draw shapes differently” (from Quartz)

I think it’s funny that when I think about how I’m drawing it, I draw it clockwise — maybe because I’ve been in Japan so long? But when I’m not thinking about it, I draw it counter-clockwise — my native-English-speaker self is still stronger subconsciously.

Gender-bending “boyband”

This article from the Guardian introduces a new “boyband” from China called Acrush.

Some excerpts follow. Try paraphrasing these sentences after you read the article, and then write your opinion about the topic. I did the first one as an example:


Original:

Paraphrase:

There is a new “boyband” in China that seems typical on the surface. The band consists of 5 good-looking singers who sing cheerful, danceable songs, and many young women have become fans. But there is one big difference: they’re girls, not boys.



“The A in the band’s name refers to Adonis, a figure in ancient Greek mythology whose name has become synonymous with male beauty.”


“Job advertisements (in China) frequently specify a desired gender, and five feminist activists were detained in 2015 for planning events to raise awareness of sexual harassment to mark International Women’s Day.


“Wang (the manager) said he originally intended to push a “cutesy” girl group. But Acrush has since become the company’s star act after a smattering of concerts led to overwhelmingly positive response, including a flood of love letters from female fans.


“The manager has prohibited members of Acrush from discussing their sexual orientation, and he said there was a sizeable contingent of “anti-fans” who trolled the band over their looks.”


“There’s a long history of cross-gender performance in China, male playing female roles and vice-versa, in traditional Chinese theatre.”


“Feminist issues are getting more and more politically sensitive under the current political regime, but as long as they don’t mention any gender issues and remain entertainment-oriented, it’s all OK.”

The quick brown fox…

The new academic year begins this week for most of us. You’ll be writing and typing a lot this year, so if you’re not already confident in your typing skills, this is a good time to practice and improve. Try this sentence:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

It’s a pangram. That means it uses all the letters of the English alphabet, so it’s often used to practice typing.

Here’s one site that can help you: Ratatype. (Caveat: before you start, this site does not seem to work well with Safari, but I had no trouble on Chrome and Firefox.)

Ratatype

You don’t have to sign up to take the typing test, but if you want to try the tutorials (Typing Tutor) and save your scores, you need to sign up (e-mail or Facebook).

ratatype menu

Start with the Typing Tutor if you’re not familiar with the keyboard and finger placement. It will start you off by practicing the middle line (asdf ghjkl;) and you’ll move through the lessons if you can do them without too many mistakes. This is Lesson 2:

typing tutor

If you’re already familiar with the keyboard and just want to time yourself, go to the Typing Test section. You can do it just for yourself, or you can compete with other users for high scores.

Your profile page will keep track of your progress:

ratatype_profile_page

I tried the typing test again this morning and my speed and accuracy actually improved a little since I did it last year . Can you beat my score? (I’ve had a lot more practice than most of you, though, I’m sure…)

Discussion / Research Question & follow-up:

Are there any pangrams in Japanese? How about another language you’re studying? (Here are some more in English.)

 

Letters of Note

Letters of Note is a compilation of more than 900 letters, postcards, memos and even faxes, often written by famous people, and almost always thought-provoking.

Here’s a recent one, from movie director Martin Scorsese, about the necessity of diversity.

diversity

An excerpt:

Why don’t they make movies like ours?
Why don’t they tell stories as we do?
Why don’t they dress as we do?
Why don’t they eat as we do?
Why don’t they talk as we do?
Why don’t they think as we do?
Why don’t they worship as we do?
Why don’t they look like us?

Ultimately, who will decide who “we” are?


Here’s one from the archives, a 1973 letter from writer E.B. White (author of Charlotte’s Web), about remaining hopeful in what seems like a hopeless situation.

wind-the-clock

An excerpt:

“Hang on to your hat. Hang on to your hope. And wind the clock, for tomorrow is another day.”


And here’s a letter from a 10-year-old to former president Obama: “Our differences unite us.” You can see his response, too.