CMN and world heritage food culture

The other day I was half-watching a segment on CNN about the newly designated world heritage status of Neapolitan pizza. They had invited a chef to come on the show and demonstrate how to make a pizza. The hosts of the show kept pushing him to spin the dough in the air, repeating the “fact” that this is what made Neapolitan pizza so special and worthy of the world heritage status. But the chef kept saying, “We don’t do this in Naples.” He explained that they do “flip” the dough on the counter, but that the in-air spinning wasn’t a Neapolitan tradition. It was funny (depressing, really) to watch this lack of communication happen.

Anyway, it made me think about how annoying CNN is these days. Everything is “Breaking News” even if they’re repeating the same story for the 10th time. And they play the same commercials about a million times an hour. The latest is the Morgan Freeman one for Turkish airlines, which was replayed — I’m not joking — 6 times in the hour I had CNN on. I call it CMN (commercial network). I know certain world leaders criticize CNN and other media for being “fake news” and I don’t want to perpetuate that, but I do wish they’d make it easier to like ¬†and support them.

As for world heritage food cultures, it was four years ago that washoku was given world heritage status. Time flies.

Advertisements

What’s your favorite Christmas movie?

This is a question one group of students was talking about in class the other day. One said, “Die Hard, of course!” Another said, “The Nightmare BeforeChristmas” A third said she didn’t know any Christmas movies. My favorite Christmas story is “A Christmas Carol” and there are many movie versions.

Here’s a graded (leveled) text from Tween Tribune about why Charles Dickens wrote the story.

“Dickens may not have gotten rich off of the publication of A Christmas Carol, but he did make the world a little richer.”

I couldn’t agree more.

There’s a new movie out this year called The Man Who Invented Christmas, which is about this origin of the story and looks like a lot of fun (unfortunately, no date on when or if it’s coming to theaters in Japan).

Of the many movie versions, I like the one with Albert Finney the best, though the one with Patrick Stewart is good, too, and I always enjoy

There are also other versions, like “Scrooged” with Bill Murray, and the seasonal favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life” is also based on the story.

So have you seen any of these? Have you read the Dickens story? I used to teach at a JHS/HS that would put on this play at Christmas time (it was either that or Les Mis).

Street food stories

This YouTube channel may not give you much language input, but it’s a good example of the demonstration task and you could try adding English explanations to one of these videos, or try making your own.

I sometimes visit family in Portland, Oregon, where street food is very popular. My favorite is Nong’s Khao Man Gai.

And this is a favorite memory, from a trip to Enoshima (and the cat waiting for leftovers)

What’s your favorite street food story?

Let’s dance

This story is about a tap dance school in Seattle, created for primarily disadvantaged kids to have an outlet for their energy, to help them build confidence, to give them a group to belong to, and also to call attention to social justice. Here’s their website.

It reminded me of a scene in the movie “White Nights” in which the two main characters — one who comes from ballet and one who comes from tap and jazz dance — collaborate on a dance that mixes both worlds. The movie has lots of other things to talk about: interracial relationships and prejudice, defection, and the Cold War.